The world starts to be crazy, the more frequent and severe hurricanes, abnormally high temperatures, and the rapid extinctions of species, all demonstrate a cruel fact - the Earth is suffering too much for the environmental disruption.

Therefore, people start to find more sustainable way to live on this planet. And some of them do create some pattern that is valuable. Kathy Jacobson is one of them. She was a nurse in the past. Witnessing too much life and death, she started to do self-examination 
about a modern life-style.

Her property is a 65-acre forest sanctuary which creates habitats for species. Kathy’s job is to help restore and sustain the healthy ecosystem. To remove the stress like energy wasting and water pollution, she and her partners, Constantine Faller and Paul Reed, also build their own solar power electricity and water collection system. Some people said they admire her self-sufficiency but she seems have a different idea on this. “I won’t call it (state of living) self-sufficiency. For me, it’s more about self-responsibility.” Kathy Jacobson said. “As a human living on this planet, it is my responsibility to establish a good relationship with all my ‘neighbors’ (all the species on Earth),
and keep our ‘home’ (the Earth) clean.”

Kathy Jacobson smokes and chats with her friends after they finished weeding deep in her woods in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep.10, 2017. The particular kind of weeds they trying to clear is called Japanese Stiltgrass, an invasive grass that threatens native plants and natural habitats.

Kathy Jacobson (middle), discusses where to start weeding with her neighbours, Angie Serrato (left) and Melissa Quick Kennedy (right) in the woods in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 10, 2017.

Kathy Jacobson opens the pod and checks the seed of asclepias syriaca inside in her garden in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 04, 2017. Asclepias syriaca, which is also called common milkweed, can help bring monarch butterflies and other insects  back to local ecosystem.

Kathy Jacobson checks and records growing state of the asclepias syriaca in her garden in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 04, 2017. Asclepias syriaca, which is also called common milkweed, can help bring monarch butterflies and other insects  back to local ecosystem.

Kathy Jacobson lies by the pool and hugs her two buddies, Tala (left) and Shilo (middle) in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 07, 2017. She raised several cat fish in the pool and fed them after work everyday.


Kathy Jacobson (left) feeds her vermicompost bin while her assistant, Paul Reed (right), take notes on some instruction that Kathy is giving him about a log entry in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 07, 2017. Vermicompost contains water-soluble nutrients and is an excellent, nutrient-rich organic fertilizer and soil conditioner. It is used in farming and small scale sustainable, organic farming.

Kathy Jacobson covers her vermicompost bin with straw in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 07, 2017.

Kathy Jacobson tries to read the word on the can in her kitchen in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 04, 2017. She canned the venison from a deer killed by accident in her property.

Kathy Jacobson picks a commercial can food from the top of the shelf in her kitchen in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 05, 2017. She prepared a bunch of commercial can food and homemade can food to survive in any natural disasters that may occur. “I always like to be prepared,” She said.

Kathy Jacobson relaxed on the sofa with her dogs, Shilo (left) and Tala (right), outside of her house in Stewart, Ohio, on Sep. 04, 2017.

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